Help Even the Unrighteous Poor

Note from the editor: This blog post by Joel Brooks originally appeared here at The Gospel Coalition January 16, 2011.

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My office is located in one of the poorer areas in the city of Birmingham, Alabama. Even as I am writing this, outside my window I can see two prostitutes standing across the street outside a hotel and a homeless man pushing a grocery cart full of cans. Confronted with scenes like this on a daily basis has made me think a lot about Jesus’ call to serve the least of these. What should this look like in my life? Over the years, I have far more failures than successes when it comes reaching out to these people.

It might not be easy, but our call to help the poor is a scriptural mandate that few would argue against. Deuteronomy 15:7-8 says:

If among you, one of your brothers should become poor, in any of your towns within your land that the Lord your God is giving you, you shall not harden your heart or shut your hand against your poor brother, but you shall open your hand to him and lend him sufficient for his need, whatever it may be.

This is just one of many passages in the Bible that show God’s concern for the least of these.

But any person who has actually spent time serving the poor realizes that it is not for the faint of heart. I have seen many passionate, bright-eyed Christians with a “heart for the poor” burn out in a matter of months or even weeks. This happens because the poor they serve often do not respond in the way they expect. As these generous people give of their time and money, they assume that the poor people they help will be appreciative and kind. Perhaps going into this they pictured a homeless man shedding tears of gratitude for the new coat and warm sandwich he received. Instead they receive not so much as a “thank you” or “God bless you.” Maybe they will even be criticized for the color of the coat or the sogginess of the sandwich. They quickly find out that some beggars can be choosers—and mean ones at that!

I experienced this firsthand recently when a homeless lady approached me and asked for money. I said that I’d buy her a meal instead. She loudly berated me in front of onlookers for this perceived insult until finally agreeing to let me buy the meal. As I walked in to the restaurant, she barked after me, “Combo number six with Dr. Pepper!” When I returned with her food, she got angry with me for bringing her the wrong dipping sauce. All in all, it was not a pleasant experience. I certainly didn’t leave with that “feel-good feeling” from helping the poor.

Certainly not all of the poor are like this. I have found many to be some of the most humble and gracious people I know, but there is no getting around the fact that some are just plain mean-spirited. Many are homeless and hungry as a consequence of their own evil actions. Often they will squander any aid you do give them. Many will never thank you or will even speak ill of you as you give of your time and money.  So does our biblical mandate to help the poor mean that we are we to spend our lives helping out people like this? The answer is YES and without reservation. Jesus Christ calls us to help even the unrighteous poor.

Response Reveals Our Spiritual Condition

There are several places in Scripture we could look to see this call, but recently I found it in an unexpected place—the story of Sodom and Gomorrah. Currently preaching through Genesis, I was surprised to find even in a story full of hellfire and brimstone God’s heart for the unrighteous poor.

Almost everyone is familiar with this story of God raining down judgment on these cities because of their wickedness. And most people assume that the sin for which Sodom was judged was sexual immorality. This is certainly how I heard this passage taught when I was younger. But the prophet Ezekiel tells us otherwise. Ezekiel 16:49 says, “This was the guilt of your sister Sodom: she and her daughters had pride, excess of food, and prosperous ease, but did not aid the poor and needy.” Sodom was judged for pride, living a life of ease, and neglecting the poor and needy—not simply for sexual sin. I don’t know about you, but suddenly this story just became a little uncomfortable for me. Instead of casting judgment on the people of Sodom, I began to identify with them.

But how does this story give us our mandate to serve the unrighteous poor? The answer is that the neglected poor of Sodom were not considered by God to be righteous. This is why they too were judged. Remember, God told Abraham that he would spare the entire city if just 10 righteous people were to be found, but there were not even 10. They were all unrighteous—rich and poor alike. The sin of Sodom was their lack of concern for the unrighteous poor, and the result of this sin was God’s judgment on both the rich and poor alike.

I have found that helping the unrighteous poor is perhaps also the best way to remind myself of the gospel by which I am saved. I did not receive mercy because I deserved it. Jesus Christ did not give his life for me because I was a good person. No, I was his enemy and full of sin when he died for me. I never did and never will earn his grace. Grace is always unmerited. So when I see how the unrighteous poor respond with bitterness to my acts of kindness, I am reminded of my own spiritual condition. Even now, I often fail to thank God for his continuous and abundant grace towards me. Thank God for the gospel by which I am being saved!

We must see our service to the poor through this gospel lens. Actually, our ability to help those who don’t deserve it is an indicator as to whether or not we have actually received the mercy and grace of God ourselves. As Jesus says in Luke 6:32-33 and 35-36:

If you love those who love you, what benefit is that to you? For even sinners love those who love them. And if you do good to those who do good to you, what benefit is that to you? For even sinners do the same. . . . But love your enemies, and do good, and lend, expecting nothing in return, and you reward will be great, and you will be sons of the Most High, for he is kind to the ungrateful and the evil. Be merciful, even as your Father is merciful.

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Joel Brooks attended Beeson Divinity School where he received his M.Div., and is currently the pastor of Redeemer Community Church in Birmingham, Alabama.

2 comments
  1. Marissa said:

    I think about this a lot. It seems to me that back in Jesus’ day, “the least of these” were the visibly ill or the very poor, because the perception was that they “did it to themselves.” Today we know that illness isn’t the result of punishment for your sinfulness, but we still berate the one who is disadvantaged because he “did it to himself.” The poor who don’t have jobs, those in prison, undocumented immigrants… As a society we have a perception that it’s their own fault they’re having trouble. Makes me wonder if those groups are the new “least of these.”

  2. Reblogged this on Miss Marti's House and commented:
    ‘But the prophet Ezekiel tells us otherwise. Ezekiel 16:49 says, “This was the guilt of your sister Sodom: she and her daughters had pride, excess of food, and prosperous ease, but did not aid the poor and needy.” Sodom was judged for pride, living a life of ease, and neglecting the poor and needy—not simply for sexual sin….’

    For the last 2 weeks, we have been walking along side a homeless family. I have learned so much about our broken government and non-profit systems. Just one quick example…. how in the world can we have open 3-4 bedroom apartments in public housing yet a 5-6 week long waiting list for shelter with Central Intake for Homeless families???? All because a budgeting class (required for residents) isn’t available until the end of the month????

    While snow falls and we sit in our warm homes with our fireplaces cracklin’, our crock pots of soup piping hot, cookies baking, hot chocolate steaming, and popcorn popping, there are families who are sleeping in their cars. In our families’ case, we (along with some loving generous friends) have paid for a hotel (for double what the government pays on their contracted rate). In addition, there’s no school today because of the ***HUGE*** snowstorm (insert sarcastic emoticon here), so no breakfast or lunch available. Oh yeah….and no kitchen in the hotel, yet there is a little fridge.

    Today, the family came over for dinner and a chance to get out of the 4 walls that are closing in on a family of 5 (mom and 4 children).

    Imagine – what would it look like if every church in RVA ‘adopted’ a homeless family or individual. Walked along side them – through medical care, through tough times, through job search – until they got on their feet again.

    How does someone who has no boot straps pick themselves up by them without some help? Sometimes…. WE need to stop worrying about GOING to church and spend more time BEING the church. It is time, Church.

    Then…I read this post and am grateful for the opportunity to love my neighbor as I am called by the Lord to do.

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