Courage

Join us on November 8th via free live stream for the Multiply gathering to hear about what God has done and what he intends to do through us in the coming days. Share this video with your family, friends, and acquaintances so that more and more people might join in on November 8 to be spurred on to making disciples who make disciples who make disciples for the glory of Christ! You can register for free here.

Advertisements
2 comments
  1. Missy Cooper said:

    In your Part III, section 3 about the Studying the Word – Logically. Can you give me a scripture or two as basis for the statement that there should only be one interpretation. I understand about different applications. But, I’m not sold on the idea that there is just one interpretation. Maybe if I saw the scripture you base this on, I might be able to grasp it. I’m thinking about subjects like speaking in tongues, different ideas about the sacrament of the Lord’s supper, and alcohol use forbidden by some denominations and embraced by others. This is what whole denominations are built on – differences of interpretation. Are you saying that within a denomination or church body there should be only one interpretation?

    • Missy,

      Great question! More than one specific verse or passage, we’re simply working from the assumption that something was intended by each passage of Scripture. For instance, according to the Bible (both Old and New Testaments) murder is wrong. Someone could interpret the command not to murder differently, but that would not be what was intended. So on less clear issues, we still believe that something was intended, even if it’s more difficult to understand. Take alcohol, for instance. It’s either okay for Christians to drink it or it isn’t… even if different interpretations arise from the same text. There definitely are different interpretations, but we’re just saying that they can’t all be true. Either infants should be baptized or they shouldn’t… one interpretation is correct, even if some people think it’s one thing and some think it’s the other. Occasionally there are passages that have different levels of meaning (ex: Psalms in which David is referring to himself as king and simultaneously foreshadowing the future King – Christ). I hope this helps. If anyone else knows how to explain this better, go for it!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: